Victoria Jenkins

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VIDEO: Victoria Jenkins explains why she is inspired by both esoteric methods of divination and rational scientific approaches to understanding.

VIDEO: Victoria Jenkins explains why she is inspired by both esoteric methods of divination and rational scientific approaches to understanding.

VIDEO: Victoria Jenkins explains why she is inspired by both esoteric methods of divination and rational scientific approaches to understanding.

To view video, you need to have the Flash plugin installed. To get Flash, please visit the Adobe website.

VIDEO: Victoria Jenkins discusses the parallels between self-help books and alchemy.

VIDEO: Victoria Jenkins discusses the parallels between self-help books and alchemy.

VIDEO: Victoria Jenkins discusses the parallels between self-help books and alchemy.

When studying photography at the University of Brighton, Victoria Jenkins embarked on a project to document museum artefacts and had a eureka moment.

She discovered that while she was interested in photography for its ability to record the visual and material world, she was equally interested in the acquisition of knowledge through studious research. So she set about finding a project that would demanded intellectual as well as artistic rigour and turned to science as her muse.

There is a close relationship between science and photography. As scientific inquiry seeks to understand nature, so photography is a means of expressing and recording the world around us. Yet while each discipline suggests an empirical and objective approach to their subject they are both fundamentally flawed as purveyors of "truth". Science is always an approximation of how we think things might work and as the scientist seeks to find solutions to their questions they inevitably upset the theories of the past. Photography can only be a representation of what the photographer sees, editing out the extraneous elements that don't fit with their aesthetic or journalistic endeavour.

It is this very collision between fact and fiction, revelation and illusion that lies at the heart of Victoria's work where the surface simplicity of her images appear to show us the factual science, but beneath lies obfuscation and trickery. The language of her work is rooted in rational investigation, employing laboratory style conditions and the vernacular imagery of scientific experiments. But these still lives are fictions, constructed to challenge the archival document. Instead they create an ambiguous narrative.

Victoria graduated in 2009 with a First Class honours in editorial photography from the University of Brighton and her talent was quickly recognised by the Aldrich Collection, Brighton who acquired some of her work. Wallpaper Magazine featured the "Images from the Institute of Esoteric Research" in their January 2010 magazine and included Victoria in their prestigious Graduates Directory.

In her article "Constructed Images" in the October issue of the BJP, Diane Smyth features Victoria with her series "Images from the Institute of Esoteric Research" which was also selected for the BJP curated show "Paper, Rock Scissors" at Toronto's Flash Forward Festival.

Victoria has exhibited both in the UK and internationally including in the group show, "Hair'em Scare'em" at Gestalten in Berlin, 2009; Magenta Flash Forward Festival, 2010; Show of Science, TROVE at The Old Science Museum, Birmingham, 2010; and at Avenuel (Seoul, Korea), 'The Science of Dreams', 2010.

She is currently working on her latest series "Magic Chambers".

LATEST NEWS: Victoria has just been announced as the winner of an international photography prize (see link below).