Joachim Froese

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Joachim Froese explains how he used his photography to come to terms with the death of his mother.

Joachim Froese explains how he used his photography to come to terms with the death of his mother.

Joachim Froese explains how he used his photography to come to terms with the death of his mother.

Still lives arranged in multiple panels are the signature style of Joachim Froese, an artist who interrogates the intrinsic properties of photography when creating his polytychs.

The motivation underpinning Joachim's photography is a constant questioning of the photographic process. He is interested in its limitations; in particular its reliance on the real world to provide content and context. He is interested in how documentary photography claims to record truth; yet is compromised by the editing decisions. He is interested in why we are suspicious of the veracity of a digital image; yet hold to the belief that the camera never lies.

So in choosing to photograph real objects, arranged in the tradition of European baroque still lives; insects and decaying food in "Rhopography"; his mother's possessions in "Archive" or his grandfather's wartime letters in "Tell Him it is all a Transition" Joachim is not concerned about whether we believe in the verity of the objects he shows us. Rather he seeks to open a dialogue with the viewer, asking us to engage with the symbolism, metaphors and narrative of his meticulously constructed fictions; as art and not a photographic record.

Joachim was born in Montreal, raised in Germany and now lives in Brisbane and Berlin. He studied for his BA in Fine Art at the University of Tasmania and completed his MA in Visual Arts at the Queensland University for Technology, Brisbane in 2001.

His work has been exhibited internationally including in solo shows at Photofusion, London; Jan Manton Art, Brisbane; Goethe Institute, Sydney; Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane; Australian Centre for Photography, Sydney and Galerie Hartmann, Munich.

His work is held in public and private collections: Artbank Australia; Gold Coast City Art Gallery; National Gallery of Australia; Queensland Art Gallery and the University of Melbourne.

Joachim currently lectures in photography at the Queensland College of the Arts in Brisbane.

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